How Long Is Rehab? The Truth

Addiction Treatment Calendar with the 15th circled in red“How long is Rehab?” is a question that comes up quite a bit at Changing Tides. We understand both the eagerness for recovery and the need to get back to the obligations of your regular day to day life, but we’re not your average drug and alcohol rehabilitation center. While we can give you a general sense of the time commitment that treatment will take, please know that there’s no cookie-cutter answer to the timeline for rehab recovery. 

All our programs provide a sense of liberty not afforded in traditional institutions. We believe more restrictive forms of rehabilitation can lead to a dependence on a rigid and isolated environment to maintain sobriety. Our team guides you through the recovery process while affording you the freedom to learn how to integrate what you learn in a real-world setting.

This learning curve isn’t simple, and it can’t happen overnight. As such, we don’t offer programs that last for one week and send you off. Our treatment plans start at 28 days. Addiction experts believe this to be the absolute minimum amount of time you need to free yourself from the confines of addiction.  We usually recommend if possible that our clients stay longer and in some cases can provide more than 90 days of addiction treatment. 

How Long Is Inpatient Drug Rehab?

Also known as a partial hospitalization program (PHP), the program involves removing yourself from your daily routine. We provide beachfront accommodation that affords you enough autonomy to look after yourself and learn how to live a sober life while ensuring addiction experts and medical staff teach you the skills and arm you with the tools necessary to change your life.

If you’ve been through a treatment program and relapsed or you’re suffering from a chronic substance abuse disorder, PHP is the course for you. You’ll attend four to six hours of activities, individual counseling and group therapy each day, five days a week. During downtime, you can use your electronic devices and go for walks along the private beach, as well as being able to stay in touch with family. Once you’re deemed well enough, we’ll recommend stepping down to outpatient care.

The minimum time period for inpatient addiction treatment is typically 28 days, but specific details vary from person to person, as no one’s experiences are the same. We are careful to work at your pace and devise customized treatment plans for each individual. 

For the first 10 days in treatment, you work closely with your primary therapist to gain a full understanding of your needs and construct a treatment plan. Once your requirements have been thoroughly assessed, you spend the remaining weeks in a mixture of group and individual therapy. With certified counselors, you’ll work through the causes of your addiction and devise new coping mechanisms and strategies to help you maintain abstinence long term. 

Are You Required to Stay Longer for Certain Addictions?

When it comes to addiction, some substances may carry more risk of physical or mental damage. Surprisingly, that doesn’t mean that the disorders with less risk of harm require less intensive addiction treatment. Substance abuse disorders are progressive diseases, and each person’s requirements are individually assessed to give them the best chance of success. Generally, the longer you attend treatment, the better chance you have of maintaining abstinence long term.

How Long is Outpatient Rehab?

  • Intensive outpatient (IOP): Depending on how severe your addiction is, we may recommend one month of inpatient care, followed by two months of intensive outpatient care. In more extreme cases, three months of the intensive course followed by several months of outpatient addiction treatment may be necessary. This is decided on an individual basis and will vary based on the person.

Our IOP is focused on integrating you back into the real world. You attend sessions that are a continuation of the residential treatment program, five days a week for three hours a day.

  • General outpatient: Once you’re ready, we’ll recommend attending the least intensive tier of care. As mentioned above, receiving general outpatient treatment may continue for several months. During this time, you can maintain abstinence on your own and work, study or volunteer. You attend sessions for one hour a day, three days a week.

Once I’ve Finished Three Months of Treatment, Will I Be Cured?

While our state-of-the-art drug and alcohol treatment programs utilize the most up-to-date knowledge on the best methods of treating addiction, treatment is not a cure. We give you the tools you need to remain sober in the outside world, but we recommend that you continue outpatient therapy or attend 12-step meetings indefinitely. Evidence has shown that people who remain in treatment for as long as possible have the best chance of enjoying a long and happy recovery.

If you’re ready to begin your journey to recovery, call one of our counselors to inquire about a course of treatment or simply talk about your needs at 252-715-3905.

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